Tag Archives: geneabloggers

52 Weeks of Personal Genealogy & History – Week #23 Books


This week’s geneabloggers prompt is books, these prompts are a great way to make family history personal and record information for your descendants. The full prompt is:

What was your favorite book, or who was your favorite author from your childhood? What do you like to read now? Books or other formats?

I am a real book addict and have been for as long as I can remember! I was a voracious reader as a child and was often told off for reading long after lights out at home. A child of the 1970s the authors and books I loved the most as a child definitely date me to this period:

  • Enid Blyton: Famous Five and Secret Seven books
  • Arthur Ransome: Swallows and Amazons
  • JRR Tolkein: The Hobbit (and later Lord of the Rings)
  • CS Lewis: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe et al

As an adult I still enjoy some of these (though maybe not Enid Blyton!) but I’ve got a real love of historical fiction with my favourite authors including:

  • Bernard Cornwell (Sharpe and others)
  • Dorothy Dunnett (Game of Kings series and House of Niccolo)
  • Wilbur Smith
  • CJ Sansome
  • Simon Scarrow
  • Conn Iggulden
  • Phillipa Gregory
  • Elizabeth Chadwick
I also enjoy crime, mystery and fantasy novels such as:

  • Colin Dexter’s Morse
  • Christopher Paolini (Eragon etc.)
  • Terry Pratchett’s Discworld etc.
  • Kate Mosse
So it’s quite a varied list of authors and books but definitely within the main genres of history, fantasy and crime or maybe a mix of 2 or more! So what books are you fondest of now or in your childhood?
I have set myself a challenge of reading 100 books this year to get back to one of my first loves. You can see the progress here.

“Surname Saturday” – Brading


I have written an Article for Geneabloggers’ Surname Saturday over on my personal blogĀ http://beckywilloughby.blogspot.com/2011/03/surname-saturday-brading.html.

The Brading family is from the Isle of Wight and by joining in with this prompt I hope that more Brading researchers will find me and my blogs so we can share information.

As long as you don’t post information on living people without their permission then joining in schemes like this is a great way to connect across the web.