Family History: English/Welsh Birth Certificates


Birth certificates were first introduced in England and Wales on the 1st July 1837 but were not made compulsory until 1864. They are a very valuable source of information because of the data they contain:

Registration District

This gives the county and sub-district the child was registered in. These have not been static over the years so you will need to be careful.

Date of Birth

Just remember this is as supplied by the person registering the birth. They may give an inaccurate date in order to make the registration appear to be within the legal time frame. Or as in the case of my 2x great grandmother to date the birth after the marriage of the parents!

Place of Birth

This often is the family’s home address but it may also be a hospital or workhouse.

Forenames

This is the name as given at registration and may have been changed at a later date or the person may have become known by their second name. In some cases a child may even have been registered with no forename.

Sex

You would think this would be straight forward with boy or girl up until 1969 and male or female since. However there have been well documented cases of children being given the wrong gender at birth.

Father’s Name

This field may not be filled in if the parents were not married. The rules over this have varied over the years but in general if an unmarried father didn’t go with the mother to register the birth then his name will not appear. Where the name is recorded it is the name at the time of the child’s birth and may not be the birth name of the father. If the parents were not married then both of them will have signed the register.

Mother’s Name

Again this is the name the mother was known by at the time of the birth. After September 1911 the mother’s maiden name (where applicable) was also included. Until the 1980s only unmarried mothers had their occupation included in this column. More recently (1984) an extra column was added for mother’s occupation.

Father’s Occupation

The paid employment of the father at the time of the birth. This may or may not be specific and can include “Independent Means”. If the father died before the birth his occupation will include deceased after it.

Signature, Description and Residence of the Informant

If this person was illiterate it will say The mark of. The following people are allowed to register a birth (listed in the order currently allowed by Registrars):

  1. The mother
  2. Father but only if he is married to mother
  3. Father and mother jointly where they are not married to one another
  4. A person present at the birth
  5. The owner or occupier of the house or institution
  6. The person in charge of the child

The residence of this person may be quite useful if not the same as the place of birth.

Date of Registration

The date the birth was actually registered. There have always been time limits on how long after the birth it can be registered. Before Registrars had access to the medical records of the actual date of birth parents were known to change the date of birth to be legal.

Change of name

If within a year of registration the child is subsequently baptised with alternative forenames then this can be recorded on the certificate too.


IT Simple Tip #3: Basic new e-mail form


I have used the Google Mail new mail form to demonstrate the basics points of e-mail creation. I chose this one as it is free to use.

Basic e-mail fields on create e-mail

I will go into more detail about e-mail elsewhere in this blog.

Family History: Record Keeping


What sort of information should you collect about your ancestors and other family members:

  • Name full name including any alternatives such as nicknames or name changes due to deed poll
  • Titles/Rank if your family member was in the military, a minister of religion or a baronet etc.
  • Date of birth
  • Place of birth be as full as possible including county/state and country, if you have actual street address this is even better
  • Baptism/Christening/other religious ceremonies these can help pinpoint Date of birth even if you haven’t got the actual date
  • Parents’ names
  • Occupation(s) this adds more interest to your tree
  • Marriage date/place where applicable – you may find your family married in same church through the generations
  • Spouse/Partners full name where applicable
  • Children’s full names and date of birth where applicable
  • Place of residence with date you can track the movements of your family through addresses on birth, marriage and death records as well as census records
  • Other names if you find other people’s names on records then it can be worth noting them down as they may turn out to be family members
  • Military service information dates, ranks, medals etc.
  • Miscellaneous information photographs, newspaper articles, schools – basically anything that makes the person more interesting or provides clues for finding out more

It is essential to keep good track of your family history data not only the actual data but the source of it. It may well be that a few years down the line you get a conflicting piece of information on an ancestor and you may need to go back to the other source to double check.

IT Simple Tip #2: Acronyms etc.


The Internet and computers are confusing enough sometimes and then people throw acronyms into the loop it can seem like trying to read a foreign language. A lot of them are used to replace the fact that there is no visual contact with the person writing the message. Here are just some of the more common ones that pop up on websites, social networks and text messaging.

LOL laugh out loud

ROFL rolling on the floor laughing

OH other half

DH dearest husband

DD darling daughter

DS darling son

: -) happy

: -( sad

:-p not being serious (tongue sticking out)

l8r later

TY thank you

TMI too much information

BRB be right back

FF Follow Friday – on Twitter a recommendation to follow another person

PICNIC Problem In Chair Not In Computer

RTFM Read the * Manual

HD hard drive

ATM at the moment

DM direct message in Twitter

RT retweet the message in Twitter

There a re lot more but these are just a few that may confuse or mislead!

Getting started in family history


You can get started on your family tree with no expense other than paper and a pen or pencil so it is an easily affordable hobby to start off with. All you need to do is set down what you already know from personal knowledge and then speak to other older family members to see what they can add.

The key information you need for each person on your tree is as follows:

  • full name
  • date and place of birth
  • date and place of marriage (where applicable)
  • spouse name¬†(where applicable)
  • date and place of death¬†(where applicable)
  • names of any children

By word of mouth you may well be able to go back in the late 1800s or early 1900s with very little effort. It maybe that some of the key bits of information are missing but these can be filled in at a later date.

You can then construct a very simple family tree starting with yourself and moving backwards:

Sample Family Tree

I got this one free from http://www.obituarieshelp.org/ .

Once you have filled in what you and your family already know then you can start to work on the blanks.

IT Simple Tip #1: Keyboard Shortcuts


I have to start somewhere so starting with something simple! During my years working in schools I discovered that it was things like learning basic keyboard shortcuts that made people’s lives a lot easier.


So here are the most important shortcuts you can learn:

Name Windows Mac Result
Copy Ctrl+C Cmd+C Copies selected item
Paste Ctrl+V Cmd+V Pastes the last item you copied/cut
Cut Ctrl+X Cmd+X Deletes selected item and holds to paste elsewhere
Select All Ctrl+A Cmd+A Highlights all the items on the page so you can quickly copy/cut or delete

 

There are many more shortcuts that each application uses but the the four above are the ones that you will use on an almost daily basis.


More tips to come and please feel free to prompt me with a question!

Welcome!


As its a new year I decided to start in a new blog as a starting point for setting myself up in business later this year. My original blog will carry on with the personal stuff and anything to do with product reviews and also hints and tips will now appear on here instead.

If you have any questions relating to IT or family history then please post them on here and I will do my best to answer them! Anyone wanting a review done on products or books then please get in touch.